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Space X, Facebook's VPN Service & More Tech News

Bottom Line IT
March 14, 2018 1:00 PM

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Segment 1
SpaceX Demo Satellite for high speed Internet project
http://money.cnn.com/2018/02/18/technology/future/spacex-launch-paz-demo-starlink/index.html

Elon Musk and his company SpaceX have dreamt of delivering high-speed internet to the masses using thousands of small satellites. That dream is becoming closer to reality as SpaceX plans to launch a rocket carrying two experimental satellites SpaceX plans to use for its internet service on Wednesday. SpaceX hopes to “deliver broadband services directly to people anywhere in the United States or around the world.”

Segment 2
Facebook’s VPN Service
https://www.wired.com/story/facebook-onavo-protect-vpn-privacy/

Reports have been circulating that Facebook is testing a new menu item called “Protect” in its iOS app. The icon takes you to the App Store listing for Facebook’s VPN app Onavo Protect. The app has many offerings that mirror a typical VPN service, but may fall significantly short in privacy protections. Onavo VPN uses a private platform that tunnels data through an encrypted path to prevent spying. However, much like the Facebook app itself, the Onavo VPN app attempts to run at all times, rather than just when you want it to, and “collects your mobile data traffic” which the company says it uses to “analyze your use of website, apps and data. Because we’re part of Facebook, we also use this info to improve Facebook products and services.” While most VPN services over time have shown that they are committed to protecting their user’s privacy, with some even showing that they delete ALL logs of user data, Facebook’s service certainly does not meet the same level of privacy.

Segment 3    
A Ruling Over Embedded Tweets Could Change Online Publishing
https://www.wired.com/story/embedded-tweets-copyright-law/

One of the more pervasive features of the internet is that one can link to content elsewhere. Whether its links or embeds to blogs, articles, or social media, content is connected throughout the internet like a massive spiderweb. However, a New York Judge’s recent ruling has threatened that massive network. Ruling that embedding a tweet containing an image from a webpage can be considered copyright infringement, the verdict threatens to challenge the way internet publishing has been done for years.

Segment 4
Google finds another bug in Mircrosoft’s Edge browser
https://www.engadget.com/2018/02/19/google-project-zero-microsoft-edge-browser-vulnerability/

Google task force entitled “Project Zero” is assigned the critical role of finding security loopholes within other companies’ products. Project Zero discovered a “medium-level security issue” within Microsoft’s Edge browser back in November. The issues regards how Edge deals with particular code execution, with this flaw, hackers are able to bypass Edge’s security offerings and can embed malicious code within the memory of a user’s computer. Project Zero typically gives a company 90 days to fix the security flaws they detect, before notifying the public.

Segment 5
U.S. Soldiers are Revealing Sensitive Information by Jogging
https://www.washingtonpost.com/world/a-map-showing-the-users-of-fitness-devices-lets-the-world-see-where-us-soldiers-are-and-what-they-are-doing/2018/01/28/86915662-0441-11e8-aa61-f3391373867e_story.html?utm_term=.72f39894c77a

Recently a map was posted on the web that showed the locations of people who used fitness devices like Fitbit. The map revealed highly sensitive information about the whereabouts of soldiers at U.S. military bases. The map shows activity that occurred between 2015 and September 2017, and while countries like the United States and those of Europe were covered in activity, small dots appeared in remote countries, potentially revealing the location of secret military bases.

Segment 6 – Bottom Line Security
The Toolkit of an Elite North Korean Hacking Group
https://www.wired.com/story/north-korean-hacker-group-apt37/

While the hacking group from North Korea called Lazarus is more well known, FireEye has released a report describing a new major player in North Korea’s hacking campaigns called APT37, that may be just as sophisticated and skilled. The group has recently been branching out from just attacking South Korean companies (which had been its favorite pass time), to attacking human rights groups, the Olympics, North Korean defectors, and even a Japanese organization involved with the UN’s enforcement of sanctions. The FireEye reports breaks down the group’s entire known toolkit, Josh joins Amy and Erik to discuss.

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